Thursday with 684 notes / reblog
theparisreview:

Haruki Murakami at his jazz club, Peter Cat, in 1978.
Tuesday with 46 notes / reblog
sivilizasyon:

Sympathy for Mr Vengeance (2002)
Wednesday with 300 notes / reblog
westindians:

 F A V E S_
"I was by myself for a pretty long time. I needed to do that. I think everyone that I know has wanted to do that or needed to do that at some point. I think when you spend enough time when it’s quiet around you and you don’t open your mouth for three or four days, there’s parts of your brain that can kind of rest. I think when we’re out in the world and we have to talk to people, we edit ourselves. You know, we have to like, act a little bit. As honest as we may be as humans, when we’re out here, we’re all kind of wearing mirrors on our faces. You know, constantly reacting to how to react to the people around you. And I think when you’re alone for a long enough time, you can feel a lot more peace."
-Justin Vernon of Bon Iver, in an interview speaking about living in his father’s cabin for three months when writing ‘For Emma, Forever Ago’ 
(via 5ft1)

(via 5ft1)

Tuesday with 14,583 notes / reblog
vandlo:


M.I.A. writing her album “Arular” - 2004 
Saturday with 4,976 notes / reblog
jesuisperdu:

FLCL <3
Monday with 2,326 notes / reblog
fourthandexchange:

Drummer/producer Ahmir Thompson known professionally as ?uestlove or Questlove, is a living link between the digital science of modern hip-hop and the flesh-and-blood textures of vintage R&B. He co-founded the Roots, universally hailed as one of the most sonically inventive hip-hop acts. Meanwhile, his collaborations with such artists as D’Angelo, Erykah Badu, and Common have reasserted the importance of real-time playing in a style dominated by sampling and programming. “I’m really into the game of making people guess, is it a machine, or is it him?” says Thompson, who also goes by the name ?uestlove (pronounced “Questlove”). One famous example is the Roots’ biggest hit, “You Got Me,” which sounds for all the world like a programmed side stick pattern—until Thompson cuts loose with a blazing drum-and-bass groove. Like much of Thompson’s work, the passage is startling, witty, and funky. “Hip-hop is based in rhythm, repetition, and perfect time,” says Thompson. “With Roots stuff, I go for a more perfect, quantized-type sound than I would with, say, Erykah or D’Angelo. For D’Angelo’s Voodoo, we wanted to play as perfectly as we could, but then deliberately insert the little glitch that makes it sound messed up. The idea was to sound disciplined, but with a total human feel.”